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November, 2010

Keeping an Ear Out For Hearing Loss

State Compensation Insurance Fund Most of us take our hearing for granted, especially when we’re young. We assume that hearing loss is unavoidable and is part of the aging process. However people who live in other parts of the world without the everyday noises of our industrial society have little or no hearing loss as Read »

State Compensation Insurance Fund

Most of us take our hearing for granted, especially when we’re young. We assume that hearing loss is unavoidable and is part of the aging process. However people who live in other parts of the world without the everyday noises of our industrial society have little or no hearing loss as they grow older.

Hearing loss in older people is not due to aging but exposure to noises over a lifetime. These noises can come from TV, traffic, machinery, and other loud sounds. Earphones have been known to be very destructive to hearing. In industries such as construction there are many sources of loud noises, which can be from equipment, such as circular saws, grinders, compressors, lift trucks, transportation equipment, and air or electric power tools.

What’s the difference between sound and noise? Noise, is unwanted sound. It’s unwanted because it can cause hearing loss; keeping you from hearing people talk or hearing emergency sounds. It can also disrupt job performance and cause stress-related problems, like cardiovascular changes, fatigue, irritability, and tension.

When is noise too loud? It’s too loud, if:

  • You have to raise your voice to be heard.
  • You can’t hear someone less than 2 feet away without shouting.
  • Speech around you sounds muffled or dull after you leave a noisy area.
  • You have ringing in your ears after exposure to noise.

Both the amount of noise and the length of exposure affect its ability to damage hearing.

Hearing loss can happen so gradually that people may not notice their hearing is being affected until it’s too late. By then, even a hearing aid may not help. Protect yourself; don’t risk losing some of your hearing when it can be easily protected. You may be unable to prevent noise but you can minimize hearing loss by following established safety procedures and using appropriate hearing protection. Use earplugs or earmuffs when noise levels are high. Silence is not always golden, especially when it’s permanent.

October, 2010

Pace Yourself

“Courtesy of the California State Compensation Insurance Fund” You’ve heard the expression, “Haste makes waste,” but hurry and haste can lead to accidents and injuries, when speed becomes more important than safety. In fact, hurrying is a common factor in many accidents. Any time you’re about to climb a ladder, drive a vehicle, pick up Read »

“Courtesy of the California State Compensation Insurance Fund”

You’ve heard the expression, “Haste makes waste,” but hurry and haste can lead to accidents and injuries, when speed becomes more important than safety. In fact, hurrying is a common factor in many accidents.

Any time you’re about to climb a ladder, drive a vehicle, pick up a heavy object or use a potentially dangerous piece of machinery, give a thought to your safety. Make a mental note to do the task at a safe and steady pace. This is especially true if you’re about to start a new job or use equipment you’re not familiar with.

Sometimes workers, especially new ones, work at a fast pace in order to impress their boss. While that kind of attitude is appreciated, it won’t be appreciated if it results in an accident or injury. For an employer, the cost of the accident could more than wipe out the profits from the job, but what’s more important is the pain, worry, and the financial loss to injured workers and their family.

There’s also another expression, “Slow and steady wins the race.” Work at a safe pace. The job will get done and everyone will end up winners.

August, 2010

Take Care With Hazardous Substances

Sometimes, in the course of your work, it may be necessary to use substances that have potentially hazardous properties. The hazards may take different forms (mist, vapor, liquid, dust, fume or gas) and affect workers in different ways. The type of substance, the way it’s used, and the form it takes determines its effect and Read »

Sometimes, in the course of your work, it may be necessary to use substances that have potentially hazardous properties. The hazards may take different forms (mist, vapor, liquid, dust, fume or gas) and affect workers in different ways. The type of substance, the way it’s used, and the form it takes determines its effect and what must be done to avoid harmful exposures. But, there are some basic safety precautions to take when working with or around any hazardous substance.

Labels and material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for substances clearly state their hazards and describe the precautions to take for their safe use. They will also tell you what to do in case of exposure or injury. If you don’t know the hazards or precautions for a substance, don’t use it until you check with your foreman or supervisor.

Always wear the recommended personal protective equipment, such as glasses, gloves or respirator. If your skin or clothing becomes contaminated by the substance, shower or wash the exposed skin areas and change or decontaminate the clothing. Engineering controls, such as exhaust ventilation, may be necessary when using certain substances. Obey any posted signs indicating areas requiring particular caution, no smoking or the necessity for personal protective equipment.

When working with or around chemicals, never take food into the work area and always wash your hands thoroughly before eating. If necessary, shower and change your clothes before going home. Don’t take contaminated clothing home to be laundered, you could expose your family to the contaminant. Properly dispose of clothing designed for single use.

Keep the work area clean so there is less risk of contamination and store substances according to label directions. Because some substances react violently with one another, you must be careful where you store them and which substances you mix together. If there’s a substance leak or spill, keep away from it unless you know what it is and how to safely clean it up and dispose of the cleaning material.

You should also know what to do in case of a substance-related emergency. Know where wash stations are located, where to find and how to use emergency protective equipment, fire extinguishers, and first aid supplies. Also know where to quickly locate the numbers of local medical, fire, and hazard response personnel. You can work safely with a hazardous substance by reading its label, following safe handling procedures, and using recommended protective equipment.

May, 2010

Focus on Young Worker Safety

Summer employment and after school jobs teach young workers responsibility, provide them with extra spending money, and in some cases, supplement family income. To employers, they can be a necessary and valuable addition for work production. But if not properly trained, jobs can put young workers at risk for injuries. Employers play a key role Read »

Summer employment and after school jobs teach young workers responsibility, provide them with extra spending money, and in some cases, supplement family income. To employers, they can be a necessary and valuable addition for work production. But if not properly trained, jobs can put young workers at risk for injuries.

Employers play a key role in creating a safe work environment and preventing injuries to young workers. Employers need to know and comply with child labor laws that apply to their business. The law outlines restrictions regarding the type of job workers under the age of 18 can and cannot do to protect their health and safety. It also sets the hours that youths may work, both during the school year and during the summer. At minimum, employers are required to provide a safe and healthful workplace, give detailed instructions on how to do a job properly; train young workers to put safety first, and provide adequate supervision. Employers should be aware of their responsibility to protect the youth they employ and to understand the potential for tragedy if laws are not followed.

Young workers have responsibilities too. They should participate in training programs related to their jobs; inform their supervisors when doing a task for the first time; ask questions if clarification is needed, be aware of their physical limitations; and report any hazards to their supervisors. Young workers also have the right to refuse to do a job if it is immediately dangerous to their life or health. With certain exceptions, a youth under 18 who takes a job must have a work permit issued by the school district.

State Fund wants to ensure that introductory workplace experiences will instill in our youths an understanding and awareness of job safety and health that will carry throughout their careers. Find safety publication material for workers, employees, parents, and other organizations by visitingwww.dir.ca.gov/YoungWorker/YoungWorkersMain.html or call the toll-free Worker Information Hotline at (866) 924-9757.

January, 2010

AMEC Earth & Environmental’s Anaheim office has merged with its recently acquired firm, Geomatrix, in its Newport Beach office. With this merger, AMEC and AMEC Geomatrix now have a staff of nearly 100 professionals and support personnel in the Orange County area offering a full range of high-quality geotechnical and environmental services. AMEC’s Newport Beach Read »

AMEC Earth & Environmental’s Anaheim office has merged with its recently acquired firm, Geomatrix, in its Newport Beach office. With this merger, AMEC and AMEC Geomatrix now have a staff of nearly 100 professionals and support personnel in the Orange County area offering a full range of high-quality geotechnical and environmental services. AMEC’s Newport Beach office is located at 510 Superior Avenue, Suite 200, Newport Beach, CA, 92663.

January, 2010

Taylor Group, Inc. has moved! Its new address is 301 Mission, Suite 201, Oceanside, CA, 92054. Taylor Group can be reached at the same phone (760) 721-9990 and fax (760) 721-9991 numbers.

Taylor Group, Inc. has moved! Its new address is 301 Mission, Suite 201, Oceanside, CA, 92054. Taylor Group can be reached at the same phone (760) 721-9990 and fax (760) 721-9991 numbers.

December, 2009

For the second year in a row, Blackburn Consulting was honored as one of CE News’ “Best Firms to Work For.” This award was presented to Blackburn Consulting’s Human Resource Manager, Kelly Dahill, at the CE News Chicago Summit on September 22. Awardees are determined by the review of an extensive confidential survey of employees Read »

For the second year in a row, Blackburn Consulting was honored as one of CE News’ “Best Firms to Work For.” This award was presented to Blackburn Consulting’s Human Resource Manager, Kelly Dahill, at the CE News Chicago Summit on September 22. Awardees are determined by the review of an extensive confidential survey of employees and management. Blackburn Consulting was ranked 34th overall and 17th among small firms, quite an accomplishment considering all of the fine firms in the nation. With offices in Auburn, Modesto and West Sacramento, Blackburn Consulting specializes in geotechnical design/construction evaluation and recommendations for public-sector projects, such as roadways, bridges, underground pipes, tunnels, dams, levees, and water resources and wastewater facilities.

December, 2009

Group Delta Consultants, Inc. (GDC) is proud to announce the acquisition of the Ontario, California office of AMEC, which will now serve as GDC’s Inland Empire office located at 4201 Santa Ana Street, Suite F, Ontario, CA, 91761. This new GDC office features a fully certified lab (DSA, AASHTO and Caltrans) and can perform a Read »

Group Delta Consultants, Inc. (GDC) is proud to announce the acquisition of the Ontario, California office of AMEC, which will now serve as GDC’s Inland Empire office located at 4201 Santa Ana Street, Suite F, Ontario, CA, 91761. This new GDC office features a fully certified lab (DSA, AASHTO and Caltrans) and can perform a complete range of asphalt, soils and concrete testing. Jim Cunneen, RCE, JD, will serve as the new Inland Empire office area manager, with Marta Landaverde continuing to serve as Laboratory Manager and John Thune serving as the Field Operations Manager.

December, 2009

Group Delta Consultants, Inc. (GDC) welcomes John Traina to the GDC team. John will be the Manager of Inspection and Testing in the firm’s Torrance office. He brings more than 20 years of experience managing inspection and testing operations throughout Southern California.

Group Delta Consultants, Inc. (GDC) welcomes John Traina to the GDC team. John will be the Manager of Inspection and Testing in the firm’s Torrance office. He brings more than 20 years of experience managing inspection and testing operations throughout Southern California.

October, 2009

Former CalGeo Board Member Mike Miller of Stoney-Miller Consultants recently delivered key testimony in support of the City of San Diego’s defense of a liability lawsuit stemming from a 2007 landslide in La Jolla. Miller’s expert testimony helped relieve the city of responsibility for the damage to 65 homes, saving taxpayers millions of dollars. Read Read »

Former CalGeo Board Member Mike Miller of Stoney-Miller Consultants recently delivered key testimony in support of the City of San Diego’s defense of a liability lawsuit stemming from a 2007 landslide in La Jolla. Miller’s expert testimony helped relieve the city of responsibility for the damage to 65 homes, saving taxpayers millions of dollars. Read more here.

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